Tag Archives: vnq

Ivy Portfolio July Update

The Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet track the 10 month moving average signals for two portfolios listed in Mebane Faber’s book The Ivy Portfolio: How to Invest Like the Top Endowments and Avoid Bear Markets. Faber discusses 5, 10, and 20 security portfolios that have trading signals based on long-term moving averages.

The Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet tracks both the 5 and 10 ETF Portfolios listed in Faber’s book. When a security is trading below its 10 month simple moving average, the position is listed as “Cash”. When the security is trading above its 10 month simple moving average the positions is listed as “Invested”.

The spreadsheet’s signals update once daily (typically in the late evening) using dividend/split adjusted closing price from Yahoo Finance. The 10 month simple moving average is based on the most recent 10 months including the current month’s most recent daily closing price.  Even though the signals update daily, it is not an endorsement to check signals daily or trade based on daily updates. It simply gives the spreadsheet more versatility for users to check at his or her leisure.

The page also displays the percentage each ETF within the Ivy 10 and Ivy 5 Portfolio is above or below the current 10 month simple moving average, using both adjusted and unadjusted data. If an ETF has paid a dividend or split within the past 10 months, then when comparing the adjusted/unadjusted data you will see differences in the percent an ETF is above/below the 10 month SMA. This could also potentially impact whether an ETF is above or below its 10 month SMA. Regardless of whether you prefer the adjusted or unadjusted data, it is important to remain consistent in your approach. My preference is to use adjusted data when evaluating signals.

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The current signals based on June 30th’s adjusted closing prices are below.   As of the close May 29, (DBC) (GSG) (VNQ) and (TIP) were below their 10 month moving average.  This month those 4 ETFs remain below their moving average. In addition, (BND) (RWX) (TIP) and (VWO) are now also below their 10 month moving average.

The spreadsheet also provides quarterly, half year, and yearly return data courtesy of Finviz. The return data is useful for those interested in overlaying a momentum strategy with the 10 month SMA strategy:

Ivy10

Ivy5

I also provide a “Commission-Free” Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet as an added bonus. This document tracks the 10 month moving averages for four different portfolios designed for TD Ameritrade, Fidelity, Charles Schwab, and Vanguard commission-free ETF offers.

Not all ETFs in each portfolio are commission free, as each broker limits the selection of commission-free ETFs and viable ETFs may not exist in each asset class. Other restrictions and limitations may apply depending on each broker.

Below are the 10 month moving average signals (using adjusted price data) for the commission-free portfolios:

Commfree1 Commfree2

Dual ETF Momentum Portfolio – June Update & Backtests

In February I announced a new “Dual ETF Momentum” spreadsheet. The idea was inspired by a paper written by Gary Antonacci and available on Optimal Momentum.

The spreadsheet is available on Scott’s Investment’s here. The objective of the spreadsheet is to track four pairs of ETFs and provide an “Invested” signal for the ETF in each pair with the highest relative momentum.

Relative momentum is gauged by the 12 month total returns of each ETF. The 12 month total returns of each ETF is also compared to a short-term Treasury bill ETF (a “cash” filter). In order to have an “Invested” signal the ETF with the highest relative strength must also have 12-month total returns greater than the 12-month total returns of the cash ETF. This is the absolute momentum filter which is detailed in depth by Antonacci, and has historically helped increase risk-adjusted returns.

I have added an “average” return signal for each ETF on the spreadsheet. The concept is the same as the 12-month relative momentum. However, the “average” return signal uses the average of the past 3, 6, and 12 (“3/6/12″) month total returns for each ETF. The “invested” signal is based on the ETF with the highest relative momentum for the past 3, 6 and 12 months. The ETF with the highest average relative strength must also have an average 3/6/12 total returns greater than the 3/6/12 total returns of the cash ETF.

Below are the four portfolios along with current signals.

Return data courtesy of Finviz
Equity  ETF Average of Quarterly/Half/Full Year % Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
US Equities VTI 15.67 Invested Invested
International Equities VEU 7.68
Cash SHY 0.04
Credit Risk  ETF Average of Quarterly/Half/Full Year % Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
High Yield Bond HYG 3.41 Invested Invested
Interm Credit Bond CIU 0.38
Cash SHY 0.04
Real-Estate Risk  ETF Average of Quarterly/Half/Full Year % Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
Equity REIT VNQ 6.51 Invested Invested
Mortgage REIT REM -1.37
Cash SHY 0.04
Economic Stress  ETF Average of Quarterly/Half/Full Year % Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
Gold GLD -15.55
Long-term Treasuries TLT -4.95
Cash SHY 0.04 Invested Invested

As an added bonus, the spreadsheet also has four additional sheets using a dual momentum strategy with broker specific commission-free ETFs for TD Ameritrade, Charles Schwab, Fidelity, and Vanguard. It is important to note that each broker may have additional trade restrictions and the terms of their commission-free ETFs could change in the future.

Using Portfolio123 I backtested a similar strategy using the same portfolios and combined momentum score used above. However, to simplify the screen I did not require an ETF to be ranked above the combined return of SHY; rather, an ETF simply needed the average of its 13 week/26 week/52 week total return to be greater than 0% (the “absolute” momentum filter). Also, the portfolio re-balanced every 4 weeks as opposed to the end of each month.  No considerations were made for taxes or commissions. The test time period was 5/1/08 – 6/10/13 and the benchmark is SPY:

dual momentum test2

A four year test period is short by historical standards but the test is limited to the trading history of ETFs within the portfolio. A more robust, index-based test of the dual momentum strategy can be found on Optimal Momentum.

If you enjoy these free tools, please consider making a donation on the home page of Scott’s Investments using the Paypal link in the upper-right corner!

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ETFReplay Portfolio for June

Among the more popular portfolios on Scott’s Investments has been the ETFReplay.com Portfolio. The strategy has been revised and improved for 2013 in order to make it simpler to follow.

I previously detailed here and here how an investor can use ETFReplay.com to screen for best performing ETFs based on momentum and volatility.   I select only the top 4 ETFs out of a static basket of  ETFs and re-balance the portfolio monthly. Previously, the static basket of ETFs was 25. This number of ETFs creates a high degree of turnover and also creates cross-over among ETFs that have a high correlations. For example, if you are only purchasing 4 ETFs each month and 2 or 3 of the ETFs are highly correlated, there is little benefit in holding more than 1 of the ETFs.

For 2013 the static basket of ETFs was reduced to 15. From this basket of 15, the top 4 will be selected each month. The portfolio will be re-balanced at the beginning of each month. When a holding drops out of the top 5 ETFs it will be sold and replaced with the next highest ranked ETF. I added the top 5 requirement in order to further limit turnover. ETFs will be ranked on a combination of their 6 month returns, 3 month returns, and 3 month volatility (lower volatility receives a higher ranking).

In addition, ETFs must be ranked above the cash ETF SHY in order to be included in the portfolio, similar to the absolute momentum strategy I profiled here. This modification could help reduce drawdowns during periods of high volatility and/or negative market conditions (see 2008-2009).

The top 5 ranked ETFs as of 5/31/13 are below:

VTI Vanguard MSCI Total U.S. Stock Market
SHY Barclays Low Duration Treasury (2-yr)
HYG iShares iBoxx High-Yield Corp Bond (4-5yr)
VNQ Vanguard MSCI U.S. REIT
EFA iShares MSCI EAFE

For June the strategy is moving to 75% cash. This will be the first time in 2013 that the absolute momentum filter has come into play and the first time since 2009 the strategy has less than 2 non-cash ETFs.  Since SHY is the second highest rated ETF, anything ranked below it will not be held.  The balance of the portfolio will continue to hold VTI since it is the highest rated ETF.

VNQ was sold for a gain of 2.4% and purchase date of 2/28/13, HYG for a loss of 1.52% and purchase date of 3/28/13, and RWX for a gain of .93% and purchase date of 10/31/12 (individual returns exclude any dividends).

The absolute momentum filter comes as somewhat of a surprise this month, although volatility increased in several asset classes in May. Time will tell if this conservative rotation helps reduce drawdowns or is a false signal.

 

Dual ETF Momentum – May Update

In February I announced a new “Dual ETF Momentum” spreadsheet. The idea was inspired by a paper written by Gary Antonacci and available on Optimal Momentum.

The spreadsheet is available on Scott’s Investment’s here. The objective of the spreadsheet is to track four pairs of ETFs and provide an “Invested” signal for the ETF in each pair with the highest relative momentum.

Relative momentum is gauged by the 12 month total returns of each ETF. The 12 month total returns of each ETF is also compared to a short-term Treasury bill ETF (a “cash” filter). In order to have an “Invested” signal the ETF with the highest relative strength must also have 12-month total returns greater than the 12-month total returns of the cash ETF. This is the absolute momentum filter which is detailed in depth by Antonacci, and has historically helped increase risk-adjusted returns.

I have added an “average” return signal for each ETF on the spreadsheet. The concept is the same as the 12-month relative momentum. However, the “average” return signal uses the average of the past 3, 6, and 12 (“3/6/12″) month total returns for each ETF. The “invested” signal is based on the ETF with the highest relative momentum for the past 3, 6 and 12 months. The ETF with the highest average relative strength must also have an average 3/6/12 total returns greater than the 3/6/12 total returns of the cash ETF.

Below are the four portfolios along with current signals. As you can see, the 12-month and 3-6-12 signals are the same with the exception of the Real-Estate risk portfolio. REM has  higher 12-month returns than VNQ; however, VNQ has higher 3/6/12 returns than REM.

Return data courtesy of Finviz
Equity ETF Average of 3/6/12 Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
US Equities VTI 16.72 Invested Invested
International Equities VEU 13.06
Cash SHY 0.17
Credit Risk ETF Average of 3/6/12 Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
High Yield Bond HYG 7.67 Invested Invested
Interm Credit Bond CIU 2.28
Cash SHY 0.17
Real-Estate Risk ETF Average of 3/6/12 Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
Equity REIT VNQ 17.17 Invested
Mortgage REIT REM 14.43 Invested
Cash SHY 0.17
Economic Stress ETF Average of 3/6/12 Returns Signal based on 1 year returns Signal based on average returns
Gold GLD -13.42
Long-term Treasuries TLT 0.46 Invested Invested
Cash SHY 0.17

As an added bonus, the spreadsheet also has four additional sheets using a dual momentum strategy with broker specific commission-free ETFs for TD Ameritrade, Charles Schwab, Fidelity, and Vanguard. It is important to note that each broker may have additional trade restrictions and the terms of their commission-free ETFs could change in the future. Also, the dual momentum strategy has historically had relatively low turnover.

If you enjoy these free tools, please consider making a donation on the home page of Scott’s Investments using the Paypal link in the upper-right corner!

ETFReplay Portfolio for May

Among the more popular portfolios on Scott’s Investments has been the ETFReplay.com Portfolio. The strategy has been revised and improved for 2013 in order to make it simpler to follow.

I previously detailed here and here how an investor can use ETFReplay.com to screen for best performing ETFs based on momentum and volatility.   I select only the top 4 ETFs out of a static basket of  ETFs and re-balance the portfolio monthly. Previously, the static basket of ETFs was 25. This number of ETFs creates a high degree of turnover and also creates cross-over among ETFs that have a high correlations. For example, if you are only purchasing 4 ETFs each month and 2 or 3 of the ETFs are highly correlated, there is little benefit in holding more than 1 of the ETFs.

For 2013 the static basket of ETFs was reduced to 15. From this basket of 15, the top 4 will be selected each month. The portfolio will be re-balanced at the beginning of each month. When a holding drops out of the top 5 ETFs it will be sold and replaced with the next highest ranked ETF. I added the top 5 requirement in order to further limit turnover. ETFs will be ranked on a combination of their 6 month returns, 3 month returns, and 3 month volatility (lower volatility receives a higher ranking).

In addition, ETFs must be ranked above the cash ETF SHY in order to be included in the portfolio, similar to the absolute momentum strategy I profiled here. This modification could help reduce drawdowns during periods of high volatility and/or negative market conditions (see 2008-2009).

The top 5 ranked ETFs as of 4/30/13 are below:

VNQ –  Vanguard MSCI U.S. REIT
RWX – SPDR DJ International Real Estate
HYG – iShares iBoxx High-Yield Corp Bond
VTI – Vanguard MSCI Total U.S. Stock Market
LQD – iShares iBoxx Invest Grade Bond

For May there are no transactions, which is typically a good sign month to month. Current positions maintaining strength tend to equate to higher returns and lower transaction fees.

The four current positions are below:

Position Purchase Price Purchase Date Percentage Gain/Loss Excluding Dividends
RWX 40.74 10/31/2012 13.18%
HYG 94.35 3/28/2013 1.59%
VTI 78.24 2/28/2013 5.14%
VNQ 69.09 2/28/2013 8.96%

The portfolio is up over 22% since inception, which currently lags the S&P 500 (via the SPY ETF) on a nominal return basis. However, you can see the potential benefit during periods of equity pullbacks (of which we have had very few the past couple of years!) when the portfolio outperformed in 2011. It has also slightly outpaced a 60/40 balanced ETF and the Permanent Portfolio:

may etfreplay

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ETFReplay Portfolio for April

Among the more popular portfolios on Scott’s Investments has been the ETFReplay.com Portfolio. The strategy has been revised and improved for 2013 in order to make it simpler to follow.

I previously detailed here and here how an investor can use ETFReplay.com to screen for best performing ETFs based on momentum and volatility.   I select only the top 4 ETFs out of a static basket of  ETFs and re-balance the portfolio monthly. Previously, the static basket of ETFs was 25. This number of ETFs creates a high degree of turnover and also creates cross-over among ETFs that have a high correlations. For example, if you are only purchasing 4 ETFs each month and 2 or 3 of the ETFs are highly correlated, there is little benefit in holding more than 1 of the ETFs.

For 2013 the static basket of ETFs was reduced to 15. From this basket of 15, the top 4 will be selected each month. The portfolio will be re-balanced at the beginning of each month. When a holding drops out of the top 5 ETFs it will be sold and replaced with the next highest ranked ETF. I added the top 5 requirement in order to further limit turnover. ETFs will be ranked on a combination of their 6 month returns, 3 month returns, and 3 month volatility (lower volatility receives a higher ranking).

In addition, ETFs must be ranked above the cash ETF SHY in order to be included in the portfolio, similar to the absolute momentum strategy I profiled here. This modification could help reduce drawdowns during periods of high volatility and/or negative market conditions (see 2008-2009).

The top 5 ranked ETFs as of 3/28/13 are below:

VTI – Vanguard MSCI Total U.S. Stock Market
HYG – iShares iBoxx High-Yield Corp Bond
RWX – SPDR DJ International Real Estate
VNQ – Vanguard MSCI U.S. REIT
LQD – iShares iBoxx Invest Grade Bond

For April the position iniShares MSCI EAFE (EFA) was closed for no gain/loss (excluding dividends). It was replaced by HYG, which is now ranked second on the list.

The four current positions are below:

Position Purchase Price Purchase Date Percentage Gain/Loss Excluding Dividends
RWX 40.74 10/31/2012 5.57%
HYG 94.35 3/28/2013 0.00%
VTI 78.24 2/28/2013 3.39%
VNQ 69.09 2/28/2013 2.08%

The portfolio is currently lagging the S&P 500 (via the SPY ETF) on a nominal basis since inception. However, you can see the potential benefit during periods of equity pullbacks (of which we have had very few the past couple of years!) when the portfolio outperformed in 2011:

 

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Ivy Portfolio – March Update

Early in 2012  Scott’s Investments added a daily Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet. This tool uses Google Documents and Yahoo Finance to track the 10 month moving average signals for two of the portfolios listed in Mebane Faber’s book The Ivy Portfolio: How to Invest Like the Top Endowments and Avoid Bear Markets. Faber discusses 5, 10, and 20 security portfolios that have trading signals based on long-term moving averages.

The Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet tracks the 5 and 10 ETF Portfolios listed in Faber’s book. When a security is trading below its 10 month simple moving average, the position is listed as “Cash”. When the security is trading above its 10 month simple moving average the positions is listed as “Invested”.

The spreadsheet’s signals update once daily (typically in the late evening) using dividend/split adjusted closing price from Yahoo Finance. The 10 month simple moving average is based on the most recent 10 months including the current month’s most recent daily closing price.  Even though the signals update daily, it is not an endorsement to check signals daily. It simply gives the spreadsheet more versatility for users to check at his or her leisure.

The page also displays the percentage each ETF within the Ivy 10 and Ivy 5 Portfolio is above or below the current 10 month simple moving average, using both adjusted and unadjusted data.

If an ETF has paid a dividend or split within the past 10 months, then when comparing the adjusted/unadjusted data you will see differences in the percent an ETF is above/below the 10 month SMA. This could also potentially impact whether an ETF is above or below its 10 month SMA. Regardless of whether you prefer the adjusted or unadjusted data, it is important to remain consistent in your approach.

Top 50 Trending Stocks

The current signals based on February 28th closing prices are below.  Real estate and equities are leading while bonds and commodities are lagging and trading below their 10 month moving average.

The first table is based on adjusted historical data and the second table is based on unadjusted price data:

As an added bonus I created a “Commission-Free” Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet. This document tracks the 10 month moving averages for three different portfolios designed for TD Ameritrade, Fidelity, and Vanguard commission-free ETF offers.

Not all ETFs in each portfolio are commission free, as each broker limits the selection of commission-free ETFs and viable ETFs may not exist in each asset class. Other restrictions and limitations may apply depending on each broker.

Below are the 10 month moving average signals for the commission-free portfolios:

If you enjoy these tools, please consider making a donation on the home page of Scott’s Investments using the Paypal link in the upper-right corner!

ETFReplay.com Portfolio – March Update

Among the more popular portfolios on Scott’s Investments has been the ETFReplay.com Portfolio. The strategy has been revised and improved for 2013 in order to make it simpler to follow.

I previously detailed here and here how an investor can use ETFReplay.com to screen for best performing ETFs based on momentum and volatility.   I select only the top 4 ETFs out of a static basket of  ETFs and re-balance the portfolio monthly. Previously, the static basket of ETFs was 25. This number of ETFs creates a high degree of turnover and also creates cross-over among ETFs that have a high correlations. For example, if you are only purchasing 4 ETFs each month and 2 or 3 of the ETFs are highly correlated, there is little benefit in holding more than 1 of the ETFs.

For 2013 the static basket of ETFs has been reduced to 15. From this basket of 15, the top 4 will be selected each month. The portfolio will be re-balanced at the beginning of each month. When a holding drops out of the top 5 ETFs it will be sold and replaced with the next highest ranked ETF. I added the top 5 requirement in order to further limit turnover. ETFs will be ranked on a combination of their 6 month returns, 3 month returns, and 3 month volatility (lower volatility receives a higher ranking).

In addition, ETFs must be ranked above the cash ETF SHY in order to be included in the portfolio, similar to the absolute momentum strategy I profiled here. This modification could help reduce drawdowns during periods of high volatility and/or negative market conditions (see 2008-2009).

The top 5 ranked ETFs as of 2/28/13 are below:

RWX SPDR DJ International Real Estate
VTI Vanguard MSCI Total U.S. Stock Market
VNQ Vanguard MSCI U.S. REIT
HYG iShares iBoxx High-Yield Corp Bond (4-5yr)
EFA iShares MSCI EAFE

The position in iShares MSCI Emerging Markets (EEM) was closed for a loss of 2.57% (excluding dividends) and SPDR International Government Inflation Protected Bond (WIP) for a loss of 1.71% (excluding dividends). These positions were replaced by Vanguard MSCI Total US Stock Market (VTI) and Vanguard MSCI U.S. REIT (VNQ).

The four current positions are below:

 

Position Shares Purchase Price Purchase Date
RWX 70 40.74 10/31/2012
EFA 49 58.98 1/31/2013
VTI 36 78.24 2/28/2013
VNQ 40 69.09 2/28/2013

 

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Ivy Portfolio Month-End Update

Early in 2012  Scott’s Investments added a daily Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet. This tool uses Google Documents and Yahoo Finance to track the 10 month moving average signals for two of the portfolios listed in Mebane Faber’s book The Ivy Portfolio: How to Invest Like the Top Endowments and Avoid Bear Markets. Faber discusses 5, 10, and 20 security portfolios that have trading signals based on long-term moving averages.

The Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet tracks the 5 and 10 ETF Portfolios listed in Faber’s book. When a security is trading below its 10 month simple moving average, the position is listed as “Cash”. When the security is trading above its 10 month simple moving average the positions is listed as “Invested”.

The spreadsheet’s signals update once daily (typically in the evening) using dividend/split adjusted closing price from Yahoo Finance. The 10 month simple moving average is based on the most recent 10 months including the current month’s most recent daily closing price.  Even though the signals update daily, it is not an endorsement to check signals daily. It simply gives the spreadsheet more versatility for user’s to check at their leisure.

The page also displays the percentage each ETF within the Ivy 10 and Ivy 5 Portfolio is above or below the current 10 month simple moving average, using both adjusted and unadjusted data.

If an ETF has paid a dividend or split within the past 10 months, then when comparing the adjusted/unadjusted data you will see differences in the percent an ETF is above/below the 10 month SMA. This could also potentially impact whether an ETF is above or below its 10 month SMA. Regardless of whether you prefer the adjusted or unadjusted data, it is important to remain consistent in your approach.

Top 50 Trending Stocks

I do not track these portfolios as hypothetical portfolios like I do with other portfolios on the site but do periodically backtest the strategy. For the most recent test results, please view December’s update.

The current signals based on January 31st closing prices are below.  International and domestic equities are leading, while bonds are lagging and trading below their 10 month moving average.

The first table is based on adjusted historical data and the second table is based on unadjusted price data:

 

Ivy Portfolio Update

Early in 2012  Scott’s Investments added a daily Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet. This tool uses Google Documents and Yahoo Finance to track the 10 month moving average signals for two of the portfolios listed in Mebane Faber’s book The Ivy Portfolio: How to Invest Like the Top Endowments and Avoid Bear Markets. Faber discusses 5, 10, and 20 security portfolios that have trading signals based on long-term moving averages.

This month’s update is a trading day early (markets will be open on the 31st) than a typical end of month update.  It also comes at a time when the long-term moving average strategy has struggled and is under scrutiny. John Hussman notes that since 2009 the S&P 500 Index has actually performed better when below its 200 day moving average than when it has been above the 200 day moving average.  He also notes the recent performance is contrary to the longer-term success of a moving average strategy:

“…since 2010, the S&P 500 has gained just 1.5% annually when it has been above its 200-day moving average, versus a striking 46.3% annual return when it has been below. Needless to say, this pattern is not necessarily indicative of how the S&P 500 will behave in the future, and is in fact contrary to the historical pattern”

Hussman focuses on one index, the S&P 500. With hundreds of markets to trade, some will follow the historical trend while others, like the S&P 500 may buck the trend for months, years, or perhaps forever. The key is not to focus or trade one market with one strategy – the S&P 500 is not the market but rather one index among many, and its asset class (US equities) one among many.

The Ivy Portfolio spreadsheet tracks the 5 and 10 ETF Portfolios listed in Faber’s book. When a security is trading below its 10 month simple moving average, the position is listed as “Cash”. When the security is trading above its 10 month simple moving average the positions is listed as “Invested”.

The spreadsheet’s signals update once daily (typically in the evening) using dividend/split adjusted closing price from Yahoo Finance. The 10 month simple moving average is based on the most recent 10 months including the current month’s most recent daily closing price.  Even though the signals update daily, it is not an endorsement to check signals daily. It simply gives the spreadsheet more versatility for user’s to check at their leisure.

Now you can follow me on Stocktwits and Twitter!

The page also displays the percentage each ETF within the Ivy 10 and Ivy 5 Portfolio is above or below the current 10 month simple moving average, using both adjusted and unadjusted data.

If an ETF has paid a dividend or split within the past 10 months, then when comparing the adjusted/unadjusted data you will see differences in the percent an ETF is above/below the 10 month SMA. This could also potentially impact whether an ETF is above or below its 10 month SMA. Regardless of whether you prefer the adjusted or unadjusted data, it is important to remain consistent in your approach.

MarketClub Holiday Special

I do not track these portfolios as hypothetical portfolios like I do with other portfolios on the site but do periodically backtest the strategy. For the most recent test results, please view last month’s update.

The current signals based on November 30th’s closing prices are below.  International equities and international real estate are the strongest sector in terms of their percent above their 10 month moving average.  Commodities and US REITs are the weakest sectors.

The first table is based on adjusted historical data and the second table is based on unadjusted price data: